As we age: get stronger

Sometimes we can get bogged down with complex messages about ageing: what to eat, how to live, the best type of exercise—it’s easy to get confused.  I like simple clear messages. This study does that.

“Grip strength is strongly and inversely associated with all-cause mortality and incidence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, COPD, all cancer, and subtypes of cancer, with associations being modestly stronger in the younger age groups”

In plain English: ...

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Which exercise for people in pain.

What’s the best exercise if we have pain? I’m often asked this question from people with back, hip or knee pain.   It’s a difficult question to answer and there is probably no ‘correct’ answer: although, there are LOTS of people trying to sell you their magic.  It can be a minefield, but here is some advice:

  • If you are being sold exercise to cure some ‘misalignment’ that they have found, be careful—these misalignment likely don’t exist;
  • If you’ve been told you have to ...
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Motivational Interviewing for Physios, Sheffield, 9/3/2019

I’m really excited to announce that we are running a Motivational Interviewing course for physios. You’ll also be pleased to hear it’s not me that’s doing it.  A few years ago, I went on a Motivational Interviewing weekend. It was great, really gave me insight into communication, and gave me some key skills and concepts to begin to develop.

However, on the course, everyone was a psychotherapist, nurse, or drug and alcohol worker.  The brilliant tutor, Paul Sullivan, said he’d never ...

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Early life trauma

When you work with people in pain, and had it a long time, it’s common to find early life trauma (see here). Stress, abuse and a dangerous world when we are young is a breeding ground for pain and multiple health issues as an adult (see here).

 

If you’re interested in how stress and trauma can stay with us, then I’d recommend you listen to this podcast with Gabor Mate.

Dave ...

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Implicit fear of lifting.

 

Do we fear lifting, even if we think we don’t?

JP Caneiro and his team have published a couple of studies that suggests we may.  These clever studies (here and here) took measurements how dangerous we view lifting—both explicitly and implicitly—in both people with and without back pain.

What did he find?  Well, no matter what we explicitly say, we all implicitly associate lifting with a round back as dangerous.  The conclusions here are ...

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Nurses with back pain

“it’s ok to round your back”,

“that’s it, no need to hold it straight”,

“yep, let it round, keep breathing”,

”yep, I know it’s not what you’ve been taught, but humour me”

If you’d stood outside my cubicle while I worked with the hundreds of nurses I’ve treated over the last 10 years, you’d most likely have heard the above conversation.  Sometimes 4 or 5 times a day.

I shy away from generalisations, as I find them unhelpful.  But the nurses with back pain that ...

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Is sitting dangerous?

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, is sitting dangerous?

In the world of work, sitting down is often described as ‘dangerous’.  Well, what is this ‘danger’.  The Daily Mirror warns us that it’s the new smoking (see here).  And the ergonomic industry warns us that it will cause back and neck pain (see here).

Well, I hate to spoil a good story, but while there have been studies showing that sitting for long periods have been associated with heart ...

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Can you stretch the ITB (Iliotibial Band)?

 

Is it possible to stretch the ITB? This is question that I frequently have to address with patients that have a hip or knee problem. The patient will often have been told that their ITB is ‘tight’ and that they need to stretch it. There is plenty of anecdotal information on the internet fuelling the urge to stretch it as well as the current trend to foam roller everything.

Let’s address whether this wide, long, thick piece of fascial tissue ...

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What is the correct posture?

This is a very topical subject at the moment and one that patient’s with lower back pain frequently comment on when they have a consultation. It is often a negative belief that their posture is poor or bad and is probably the reason why they have back pain. Other common beliefs are that their back is too arched (increased lumber spine lordosis), they are mis-aligned, they have tight muscles, the pelvis is too tilted and they have a leg length ...

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Clinic starts Parkinson’s classes at Bramall Lane

 

The former manager of Sheffield United, Billy McEwan is attending PD warriors classes at Hallamshire Physiotherapy clinic.  So successful have the classes being that Billy approached his old club to see if they could host the sessions.  These now run twice a week at Bramall Lane for people  with Parkinson’s (PD).  For more information follow the link or contact Hallamshire Physiotherapy clinic ...

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Conversations with Purpose: New course for Physiotherapists in 2017

Tutor: Paul Sullivan BSc, MSc, Pg Dip

 

Strengthening patient-therapist interactions in physiotherapy

Sunday 22nd January 2017; 9am – 5pm; Hallamshire Physiotherapy, 2 Newbould Lane, Sheffield, S10 2PL

£85; 8hrs CPD.

About the course

History talking is an overlooked part of the treatment encounter, and is often shortened so objective assessment and treatment can be prioritised. However, modern research highlights the complex interaction of factors across the bio-psychosocial spectrum that underpins most pain disorders. Getting information across this spectrum, while building trust and a therapeutic relationship, ...

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