Exercise and New Year Resolutions

The New Year is looming and for many people getting back to or starting an exercise programme is high on the New Year resolution list. The pattern we tend to see is that people get over enthusiastic with the chosen exercise regime, injure themselves and enthusiasm wanes. If you are returning to exercise after a long break it is important to understand that our bodies are constantly adapting to the stresses and forces we put through them. If we have ...

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Previous Clinic Physio gets top award

Rivca Swinson received an Australian Physiotherapy association’s inaugural prize for her work in the rehabilitation of one of her patients. Chelsea Grandfield fractured her neck in three places and then suffered a stroke at seventeen years old. Rivca’s hardwork and positive thinking helped provide the motivation for Chelsea to make a full return to normal activity. Rivca now works in Tasmania, Australia but she trained at Sheffield Hallam University and was taught by Karen and Steve Hodgson. ...

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Knee surgery or Physiotherapy?

I am always surprised to witness patient’s enthusiasm to have surgery compared to other patients who are health professionals. If you work in a hospital and see many operations, I suspect you get a better informed opinion of surgery. Surgery sometimes is the best option, but it doesn’t always work and can leave you worse off than before. This next review supports this belief.

Research
A recent review of knee arthroscopy (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25157057 ) for degenerative meniscal ...

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Knee pain for 30 years helped with Physiotherapy.

This testimonial is a fantastic example of how you can still have improvements and fundamental changes in movement patterns after a 30 year period. Arguably this patient was never properly rehabilitated and had accepted that no further improvement were possible. He had adapted his gait pattern and this became his new motor programme. I only came across this gentlemen because he had twisted his knee and it had become acutely swollen and painful. Once this acute injury settled we continued ...

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Why activity is the best medicine

Anyone who attends Hallamshire Physiotherapy is asked about their activity level. Encouraging people to move and become active improves the pain experience and helps with joint mobility, balance and strength. As this diagram indicates the benefits to exercise and myriad and more benefits to activity are being discovered regularly. Whatever your problem, just keep active.

Inactivity and health

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If you fracture your heel, do you need an operation?

It seems logical, you break a bone and the best management is to repair it with an operation. However, the human body has an amazing ability to repair itself and many fractures are best managed by letting nature take its course.

Recent research published in the BMJ compared surgery with conservative management in 142 with heel fractures. The conservative group had the best outcome with good healing and less complications.

Some fractures will need operations, but for many gradual ...

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ITB syndrome or wrong diagnosis in a runner?

A few weeks ago I assessed a runner who had pain on the outside of their knee following a marathon. He wanted a second opinion as treatment so far had not helped.

He ran regularly and had completed several marathons over the years. His pain was worse with running or sitting.

A diagnosis of ilio tibial band syndrome (ITB syndrome) was made. Orthotics, stretching and local treatment was given. A suggestion that one leg was shorter probably caused the problem.

Why did he ...

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Stress Fractures in Runners: what you need to know

The Problem.

We occasionally come across stress fractures in runners and the main focus of treatment is on re-education of their training and increasing awareness of their individual soft tissue capabilities. Listening to your body and knowing when to reduce training or have sufficient rest after a specific event is very important and all too often neglected and this can cause a problem. We commonly observe that many runners are reluctant to modify their training schedules and a reduction in volume ...

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The Myth of Leg Length Discrepancy

As a Physiotherapist I commonly come across patients that have been told that they have a leg length discrepancy from fellow health professionals including Physiotherapists. In some instances these supposed leg length discrepancies are corrected by specifically made insoles or shoe raises or inserts. The issue I have is that it is common to have up to a 2cm difference in leg length differences and this is normal. I would argue that the apparent leg length is more related to ...

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Physio before Hip replacement: is surgery always needed?

Hip replacement is a very common surgical procedure and the number of patients that have this operation continues to rise exponentially. Is this a good thing and do we need to perform all these operations? In short the answer is no.

Take this common example, we will call him ‘Fred’ for convenience, and Fred has had six months of pain over his right hip. He sees his Doctor who sends him for an x-ray that clearly shows ‘degenerative changes’ in ...

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